Selected Speeches (Dr. Shyamal Majumdar)

Welcome Remarks
International Symposium on Public-Private Partnership in TVET
December 1, 2008, 9:00 A.M - Ballroom A,
Crowne Plaza Hotel Manila

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Inaugural Address
Regional Program on TVET for Sustainable Development and Social Equity
July 7, 2008, RMUTT Thailand

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Inaugural Address
CPS-CPSC 1st Joint Training Program on  Entrepreneurship Development using Blue Ocean Strategy
July 14, 2008, Hilton Hotel, Colombo, Sri Lanka

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Inspirational Address
74th Commencement Exercise
Western Visayas College for Science and Technology
March 27, 2008

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Welcome Remarks
by Prof. Dr. Shyamal Majumdar
Inauguration of the International Symposium on Skills Development for Poverty Alleviation
25 January 2008, Manila, Philippines

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Opening Remarks
by Prof. Dr. Shyamal Majumdar
Inauguration of EMINENT EXPERTS GROUP MEETING (EEGM)
28 January 2008, Manila, Philippines

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Opening Remarks
by Prof. Dr. Shyamal Majumdar
National Consultation Workshop
5 December 2007, Manila, Philippines
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Acceptance Speech of the CPSC Director General Dr. Shyamal Majumdar
CPSC Turn Over and Oath Taking Ceremony
14 August 2007

 

 

 

WELCOME REMARKS OF THE CPSC DIRECTOR GENERAL
International Symposium on Public-Private Partnership in TVET
December 1, 2008, 9:00 A.M - Ballroom A,
Crowne Plaza Hotel Manila

o His Excellency, Rajeet Mitter, Chairman of the CPSC Governing Board;

o Excellencies, Members of the CPSC Governing Board and diplomatic corps;

o Dr. Mona Valisno;

o Mr. Rajat Nag;

o Dr. Rupert Maclean;

o Dr. Harry Stolte,

o Other distinguished Guests and Symposium Delegates;

o Ladies and Gentlemen;

MABUHAY!

Good Morning.

It is my immense pleasure to welcome you all to this International Symposium on Public-Private Partnership in TVET: Challenges, Opportunities and Best Practices.

Let me start by thanking all of you for coming here today to inaugurate our 2-day activity and share in achieving our key objective to examine existing partnerships between public and the private sector in education, with focus on TVET.

I also would like to thank our co-organizers for this symposium, the UNESCO-UNEVOC International Centre in TVET represented by Dr. Rupert Maclean, Director; and InWEnt, represented by Dr. Harry Stolte which have both given their generous support and cooperation to make this international gathering possible.

We have delegates from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Fiji, India, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, China and representatives from government and non-government institutions, academe and international organizations from the host country, the Philippines.

We have distinguished speakers and session chairs from UNEVOC, UNESCO-APNIEVE China, European Training Foundation, Asian Development Bank, Asian Development Bank Institute, Colombo Plan Secretariat, Department of Education of the Philippines, Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of Korea, Valencia University of Technology of Spain, SEAMEO-INNOTECH, PETRONAS of Malaysia, University of Technology of Japan and University of Moratuwa of Sri Lanka, Gokongwei Brothers Foundation, University of the Philippines and representatives from CPSC member countries.

We are honored to have the presence of distinguished Ambassadors and Representatives of CPSC member and non member countries from Bangladesh, India, Iran, Rep. of Korea, (MALAYSIA), Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Laos.

As we discuss experiences and best practices, we are lucky to hear experiences in PPP from Latin America, Europe and Asia and the Pacific regions in the next two days.

This international symposium is an offshoot of the initiative started as early as January of this year. The 2008 Manila Declaration on Skill Development for Poverty Alleviation puts forward a 12-point strategy for action which focuses on capacity building.

One of these strategies is Public-Private Partnership (PPP). Here, one of the recommendations was to:

“Advocate strategic public-private-community partnership (PPCP) models at national and local levels to address specific programs.”

Taking the cue from this, CPSC, in cooperation with UNEVOC and INWENT seek to draw the focus on reviewing the challenges, opportunities and best practices that can be shared among all stakeholders to build on new strategies and learn lessons from.

There are two questions which we hope to be enlightened with in the coming two days:

1. How can public education be managed privately? and

2. How can private education be accessed publicly?

The concept of PPP is a pro-active development of the relationship between the private sector and public institutions.

It is important to note that all relationships require a little of give and take. A culture of trust and sound risk taking is essential Ultimately, it should give mutually beneficial return for both sectors or entities, with a very wonderful opportunity to exercise SYNERGY.

Public-private partnership stimulates Ownership and enhances Resources and allows the sharing of Risks. These are important reasons why this framework is very much factored in the many segments of human resources development, especially in TVET.

We want to share experiences in PPP, study different models, learn from each success and failure and draw emerging best practices.

We are lucky to have in the next two days heads and representatives of both the public and private institutions and organizations to stimulate discussions and crystallize ideas arising from the discussion.

By the end of the Symposium, we hope to gain learned lessons to build on future strength and partnership prospects.

We are also intending to have a follow up declaration that is specific to PPP in TVET, to set the general future directions we will take.

CPSC has taken initiative to develop a strategy for PPP involving the We are grateful to UNEVOC and InWEnt to co-sponsor this event.

Once again, let me welcome all of you, Guests, Speakers, Delegates, Ladies and Gentlemen. Welcome to Manila, Philippines! Welcome to a very interesting 2 days ahead!

Let us join hands in Planning Prosperity Together!

MABUHAY!

 

 

Inaugural Address
Regional Program on TVET for Sustainable Development and Social Equity
July 7, 2008, RMUTT Thailand

Distinguished Guests;
Ladies and Gentlemen;

Good morning!

Welcome to this Regional Program on TVET for Sustainable Development and Social Equity.

First let me express my appreciation to the Ministry of Education through Vocational Education Commission Secretary General Veerasak Wongsombut; and the Rajamangala University of Technology Thanyaburi, led by distinguished University President Assoc. Prof. Numyoot Songthanapitak, for cooperating with CPSC in this regional program.

This joint RP comes very timely as this is the first collaborative program after the Royal Thai Government rejoined CPSC membership last February 2008.

The decision to rejoin CPSC was anchored on Thailand's role in technical cooperation which has shifted from being a traditional recipient of cooperation to becoming a development partner.

Keeping this as a basic principle, I am confident that the cooperation within CPSC will get more boost in the facilitation of south-south cooperation in TVET; and the assimilation and dissemination of best practices.

It is thus a good day to celebrate this milestone here, in Thailand itself, with all of you as our witness in this important event.
I also wish to thank our distinguished delegates participating in this program.
The scope of the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development is broad and the potential effects are far-reaching.
Fortunately, we hold part of that responsibility to make the reach meaningful for all of us.
Development in the 20th Century primarily followed only the economic track and has left behind social and environmental stability, resulting in rising poverty, inequality of income and development, natural disasters and global warming. Therefore it was not sustainable.

Moving towards the goal of sustainable development requires fundamental changes in human attitudes and behavior- in our personal lives, in our community activities and in our places of work.

To successfully make these changes is to accept that they are critically dependent on education and training. Therefore, Technical Vocational Education & Training (TVET) system requires deep immersion in the understanding and practices of Sustainable Development.
We are standing in the middle of the implementation of the UN decade of education for Sustainable Development, which started in 2005 up to 2014.
Three years after it started, perhaps it is the best time to ask: Do we fully understand sustainable development and what can TVET do to help achieve it?

The essential characteristics of education for sustainable development are that: (1) it is based on the underlying principles of sustainable development; (2) it deals with the well-being of the three realms of sustainability which are environment, society and economy; (3) it promotes life long learning; (4) it engages formal, non-formal and informal education; (5) is locally relevant and culturally appropriate; (6) addresses content taking into account context, global issues and local priorities; and (7) uses higher order pedagogical techniques that promote participatory learning and higher order thinking skills.
Perhaps you will all agree that TVET and sustainable development are inevitably connected.

As a life-long learning platform, and process, TVET has an important role to play in raising awareness, shaping the skills and inculcating essential habits to put sustainable development into practice.
Unfortunately, Technical Vocational Education & Training in many countries remain locked up in the role of being a mere supplier of skilled labor to industry.
Therefore, it is unable to respond effectively to the needs of the sustainable development strategies.
In the next five days, it is our goal to discuss and have a very participative exchange of experiences, pitfalls and turn-arounds to make make TVET more responsive in creating new thinking, new habits, new practices and new designs towards sustainable development and social equity.

Let me end by sharing the 5R principles of sustainable development, which are, Reduce, Reuse Recycle, Repair and Rethink.

In the context of achieving sustainability and social equity, let us join hands to make TVET meaningful for all.  THANK YOU.

Inaugural Address
CPS-CPSC 1st Joint Training Program on  Entrepreneurship Development using Blue Ocean Strategy
July 14, 2008, Hilton Hotel, Colombo, Sri Lanka

Distinguished Council President, Prof. Lakshman;
Colombo Plan Secretariat Secretary General, Patricia Yoon-Moi Chia;
Distinguished Guests and Resource Speakers;
Delegates from Colombo Plan countries;
Ladies and Gentlemen;

A very good morning!

It is indeed a great pleasure and honour to welcome you to this first ever CPS-CPSC joint program, which is an important milestone for both CPSC and CPS.

Allow me to convey my sincere appreciation and thanks to Secretary General, Ms Patricia Yoon-Moi Chia and Council President, Prof. W.D. Lakshman, for organizing such a timely and important program on Entrepreneurship Development using Blue Ocean Strategy  which is a  marriage of the development interest of both CPSC and CPS. We are extremely happy to take up jointly the relevant socio –economic development concerns which are borne in the same principle of catalyzing development under south-south cooperation.

Perhaps, you will all agree that entrepreneurship is not a new term. Due to acute skills shortage in both formal and informal sectors, its importance has become more profound now than ever. Globalization and Technology trends have become big enablers to the requirement.
Economically, entrepreneurship invigorates markets and creates job.
Socially, entrepreneurship empowers citizens, generates innovation and develops risk-taking mentality.
However, TVET curriculum has not given due importance to integrate Entrepreneurship Development. Hence, we need to give deep thought on this in a systematic manner.
Many countries in the region have many pioneering practices and benchmarks of success in entrepreneurship development which we need to share.
To address these concerns, this program will help you understand the innovative concept and potentials of Blue Ocean Strategy (BOS), as an “out-of-the-box” concept in entrepreneurship development. Through this program, we also want to impart the applications of BOS in entrepreneurship promotion and development for developing countries.

In conclusion, I do hope that the two-week program would open up new way of thinking and allow free-willing discussion to cross-fertilize ideas from other delegates from different cultural and economic background and perspectives.

Thank you, and once again, thank you to CPS for hosting this programme here in Colombo.

 

INSPIRATIONAL ADDRESS
74th Commencement Exercise
Western Visayas College for Science and Technology
March 27, 2008



Distinguished College President, Board of Trustees, Educators, Graduates;
Ladies and Gentlemen;


Introduction

First, let me congratulate all of you, the graduating class of this 74th Commencement Exercise. I congratulate the Faculty Members and School Administrators for their hard work in helping you reach this far.

Perhaps, a number of you will be seeking opportunities overseas, some will choose to stay in the Philippines to pursue careers in education, or work in the industry, pursue higher education, or become professionals in specialized fields. Some of you will join politics, hopefully not to be politicians but to be true leaders.

And of course, our distinguished and successful 28 new graduates of the Graduate Education programs, will be holding more important positions in their respective fields.

No matter what the future holds, it is a fact that all of you will contribute and be equally responsible for the fate of this good nation. All are accounted for in doing something to help the Philippines rise to new heights.

I remember a few hours ago before coming here, a rush of gladness filled my heart as I made my very first visit to the beautiful city of Iloilo. I have been mesmerized by the beauty of the place in today’s summer setting. I have been heartened by the sight of the smiling  Ilongos I have met so far.

Against the historic and peaceful backdrop of Iloilo are friendly faces full of warmth, hospitality, hope, dreams, and potentials --- typical of Filipinos.

Iloilo, to me, reflects a well-organized, developing city. You are all part of its integration and its becoming one of the cities to look forward to, in terms of building the nation. This thought has been affirmed by the fact that Iloilo serves as an economic hub in the Western Visayas region.

For a country with so much reason to be proud of, each one of you has a role to play. My new-gained familiarity of the place brings me to deep thinking.

The Philippines is one of the unique countries in this Asia Pacific region which produces highly capable and competitive workforce.  I have come from India, a country where competitiveness is very much inculcated in each segment of the society.

Competitiveness is a combination of hard work, knowledge and good disposition. This combination is a natural gift among Filipinos.

The continuing upsurge in the opening of foreign businesses in the Philippines is evidence to prove this. Foreign employers of service-oriented and IT jobs, choosing Filipino workers over other nationalities, is becoming a common place.

Everywhere in the world you will find successful Filipinos, who are highly respected, highly competitive and well-trusted in their chose fields, here and abroad.

Quest for Life long learning

As you graduate today, it does not mean that your quest for learning stops from here. Rather, you are just about to begin a long journey.

In a study made by IBM, it described the fast pace of technological changes which make 50 percent of computer knowledge irrelevant within 1 year, technological knowledge in 3 years, specialized vocational knowledge in 5 years and higher education knowledge in 10 years.

This phenomenon gives the natural urge for young people and the like to search for new learning and experiences. The only answer to this study is life-long learning. As a concept, Life-Long Learning means that "It’s never too soon or too late to learn."

And I think a better way to fully appreciate life-long learning is to understand the process of "Learning to Learn." Learning to learn is discovering different approaches to learn more, to increase understanding of principles, continually improve learning skills and expand your "stock of knowledge."

In today's global economy driven by knowledge, human capital in quest for life long learning, is the nation's wealth.

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) estimates that more than half the wealth of industrial society is derived from the knowledge capital.

The knowledge-based society recognizes the key role of information-based technologies. The developing countries are fast moving towards achieving all these.

Paradigm Shifts in technology, society and economy

Perhaps, you are all aware that the 21st century presents radically different changes in the economy and the society. We have to set our goals to achieve life-long learning.

First, let us see the technological trends that are sweeping across Asia and the Pacific region. The major shift in technology is dominated by the move from

 Narrow band to Broad band;
 Divergent Technology to Convergent Technology;
 Wired to Wireless Technologies;
 Local to Global Technology; and
 Electronic to Integrated Technology.

Secondly, in the economic front, the opening of trades has opened new doors for borderless movement of technology, product, services and labor. It has been changed from information economy to knowledge economy, Tangible Deliveries to Intangible Deliveries.

Thirdly, in the social front, the trends have been moving from:

 â€œJust Growth” to “Inclusive Growth. 
 Conventional Development to Sustainable Development; and
 Gender Inequality to Gender Parity.

All are inter-related. But what do I mean by Inclusive Growth? The whole Asian region is divided into two faces. While we celebrate the shining face of  Asia, the other face of Asia is poor. The growing divide between the rich and the poor is troubling. And it threatens the sustainability and stability of the region.

Recognizing this trend, the only way to close the social development gap is to make the development process more inclusive in all critical dimensions, which are economic, social and political.

All the trends I mentioned have profound implications on Education and Training. Education and training in the region need to take note of the paradigm shifts caused by Globalization, ICT revolution, rapid technological changes and Sustainable Development.

Education and the World of Work

Education has the intrinsic role to impart life skills, to prepare students for the world of work, allow for full development as a well-being and encourage seeking higher order cognitive skills.

It can be argued that when learning through facts, drill and practices, rules and procedures were more adaptive in earlier days.

Now, learning through projects and problems, inquiry and design, discovery and invention, creativity and diversity, action and reflection are more tilting in the present times.

You are all graduating with the honor of getting through what seems to be the most difficult stage of your life. But believe me, the world out there is much tougher. And most importantly, it consists of Red and Blue Oceans, where one must find his niche and space to swim.  I will not elaborate much on Red and Blue Oceans and let you discover it for yourselves.

Thanks to your alma mater for preparing you to face them.

Consistent with the challenges ahead, I must commend the academicians and administrators of the Western Visayas College for Science and Technology. First, for building this truly academic and technical learning community up to the marks, and secondly for living its mission, to give our young and professional graduates the best education possible.

I must say that its mission is well placed with the cultivation of students’ holistic development through the integration of spiritual, liberal, vocational, scientific and technological education.

Principles to Live By

Let me share with our dear graduates three important principles to live by to be truly productive contributors of the society.

First is Teach Mind.

Bill Gates never finished College. He was at the best university of the United States, in the midst of students of high energy and intelligence set to rule the United States.

However, he was interested in doing other things than to get a Harvard degree. I did not mean to promote the equation that completing four years of College is just as good as dropping out from school, and getting the same result, anyway. It happened to Bill Gates, but not all can be like him.

His was a story of Teaching his own Mind, how to be different and make a difference in his and others’ lives. He was uncertain but did not give up to teach himself to be DRIVEN.

More than the phenomenal success of putting up Microsoft, the world’s most successful computer software company, he was driven to apply the initial ideas he learned from Harvard, and use his economic power to address the world’s social inequities, which he claimed, he never learned from Harvard.

He was the most successful drop out. But he taught the world’s greatest mind how to make a difference by being driven.

If you were asked, what principle would you teach your mind and others' after College?

Second is Touch Heart.

Happiness is brought by touching heart. The true happiness of life and work is drawn from doing the right thing to move the world using your heart.

You have a good education on one hand; and a good heart, with a sense of commitment and responsibility on the other. When you have both, education and heart function constructively for the benefit of the society. If you lack any of the two, you are unhappy, restless, and worse, mechanical.

If you were asked, how would you want to touch other people's heart in your chosen profession?

Third is Transform Lives.

Transforming lives is the sum of teaching mind and touching heart.

Former US President Woodrow Wilson once said: "every man sent out from college education should be a man of his nation, and a man of his time." While you are bound to safeguard the national interests and take advantage of technological advancements, you must also safeguard human interests by changing humanity for the better.

If you were asked, how far would you go in transforming lives?

I am confident that all of you graduating today will do the needful to bring positive  transformations.


Conclusion

Let me close by quoting John F. Kennedy, who once said:

“There are those that look at things the way they are, and ask, 'Why?'
I dream of things that never were, and ask 'Why not?'

"Your minds are still young and your hearts are pure at this stage. It is the best time to tell you how much impact you could do to the society. Continue the quest for life long learning, while keeping in mind valuable principles to serve humanity.

I congratulate all our dear graduates for making this far, and aspiring to go further.

I congratulate all the parents for your love and support in every step of the way.

And most importantly, I congratulate the teachers and educators who have been instrumental in preparing our graduates today to Teach Mind, Touch Heart and Transform Lives to become active contributors of the society.

 

 

 

WELCOME REMARKS
by Prof. Dr. Shyamal Majumdar
Inauguration of the International Symposium on Skills Development for Poverty Alleviation
25 January 2008, Manila, Philippines

Honorable Secretary Jesli Lapuz;
Honorable Mr. Rajat Nag;
Respected Dr. Efison Munjanganja;
Respected Dr. Erlinda Pefianco;
Respected Dr Numyoot Songthanapitak;

Distinguished Speakers from international and development partners;
Distinguished Delegates and Media Representatives;
Ladies and Gentlemen;

Welcome to the International Symposium on Skills Development for Poverty Alleviation!

First, let me thank all of you from the bottom of my heart for your keen interest and kind participation. Our deep appreciation goes to all our distinguished inauguration speakers for your participation and for sharing your valuable time with us.

We also value and thank all our session speakers from the ADB, UNESCO UNEVOC, UN FAO, ILO, European Training Foundation, SEAMEO, University of the Philippines, KUT, IBM, PCCI and RMUTT for supporting the objectives of this symposium. We welcome representatives from Member Countries of Asia Pacific Region.

We also give special acknowledgement to the Department of Education, Department of Foreign Affairs and TESDA as our partners in the host country.

Seven years back, the new millennium began with a great global dream. One hundred eighty-nine (189) countries took a historic oath to reduce poverty by half by 2015 as a part of the MDG Goal. Never in the world history did we listen to such a bold declaration --- in one voice.

Seven years later, very recently, Millennium Development Goals Mid-year Program report had been published by the Asian Development Bank in collaboration with the UNDP and UN ESCAP.

While the report acknowledges the decline in poverty reduction down from 1/3 in 1990 to less than 1/5 in 2005, it means that a significant proportion, over 620 million people in the region, still live on $1 a day poverty line. It has also been reported that non-income MDG goals in many developing countries have been progressing very slow.

Now the crucial question is: Will we be able to achieve the MDG target by 2015?

Definitely, we all agree.

For this, a multi-dimensional multi-pronged strategies need to be given a big push forward to achieve our dream. A fast track initiative needs to be undertaken by all of us.

In my opinion, there are basically three dimensions of overarching strategies to fight poverty. First is economic, second is social and third is political. In all these three dimensions, I think all of us will agree that Education, particularly Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET), plays a pivotal role and chief contribution  to fight against poverty.

In this regard, allow me to quote from UNESCO-UNEVOC Declaration 2004, which has emphatically stated that "if Education is the key to development, TVET is the Master Key that can unlock the doors for the reduction of poverty in order to improve the quality of human life and promote sustainable development."

With these, we are bound to think differently and to think in a new way.

In many parts of the region, innovative initiatives have been developed to make the MDG target cohesive. Many of these if shared with other countries, can offer new insights for planning and implementation of effective anti-poverty program. In fact, successful experiments may be transplanted into various national and cultural settings with provisions for local creativity and innovations. Some of the major recent initiatives in these directions are as follows:

Development of modular employable skills

  • Application of ICT Skills in developing Information capital
  • Development of public-private partnership model
  • Strengthening entrepreneurship skills
  • Development of skills standards, certification and accreditation
  • Emphasis on skills development in rural and unorganized sector
  • Promotion of social entrepreneurship model
  • Strengthening of inclusiveness

In this regard, I'd like to quote from ILO, 2003 report which states, "Poverty elimination is impossible unless the economy generates opportunities for investment, entrepreneurship, job creation and sustainable livelihoods,." We further believe that "the principal route out of poverty is work." This may be realized by promoting entrepreneurship, sustainable livelihood, technical skills development, and advancement in ICT skills.

The CPSC through this International Symposium, aims to provide a venue for discussion and sharing of knowledge and experience in dealing with the dimensions, issues and approaches in providing relevant and effective skills development for poverty alleviation.

The main objectives of the symposium are :

  • To share best practices in skills development for poverty alleviation
  • To learn lessons from experiences and past failures;
  • To develop framework for capacity building exercise; and
  • To examine issues and challenges for gainful employment towards poverty alleviation

I am confident that the cross fertilization of ideas and experiences sharing during this symposium will lead to a set of recommendations for poverty alleviation through Technical, Vocational Education and Training Skills. CPSC plans to document this significant event in the form of a publication which is hoped to become a guiding document to build up capacity building exercises to fast track initiatives to achieve MDG through regional, international cooperation and partnership.

Let me conclude my welcome note with a challenge shared by Honorable Nelson Mandela in his campaign to end poverty.

He said that "We should not look the other way; we should not hesitate. Recognise that the world is hungry for action, not words. Act with courage and vision."

MARAMING SALAMAT PO!

MABUHAY!

 

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WELCOME REMARKS
by Prof. Dr. Shyamal Majumdar
Inauguration of the Regional Program on
Poverty Alleviation through Promotion of Entrepreneurship
21 January 2008, Manila, Philippines

 

Her Excellency, Phoebe Gomez, Chair-Alternate of the Technical Cooperation Council of the Philippines and former Philippine Ambassador to Myanmar;
Distinguished delegates from member countries of CPSC;
Ladies and Gentlemen;

MAGANDANG UMAGA!

MABUHAY!

Welcome to the Regional Program on Poverty Alleviation for Promotion of Entrepreneurship! Welcome to CPSC Family!

First, allow me to thank all of you for coming to Manila from your respective countries for this two-week course.

I also thank your respective governments for sending you here to take part in this very timely and relevant program.

As all of you know that in the year 2000, 189 countries of the world have jointly taken an oath to reduce poverty by half by 2015 as major part of the Millennium Development Goal.

Recently, the 2007 MDG progress report in Asia and the Pacific region has been published by the Asian Development Bank, UNDP and UN ESCAP. It shows that Asia Pacific region has been moving ahead in meeting many of the MDGs and good progress has been done. China has been the largest achiever in the region.

However, an enormous challenge in eradicating poverty still exists. More than 1.7 billion Asian people are estimated to still be living below US$ 2 a day poverty line. On the other hand, a recent report in the progress and status of achieving the Millennium Development Goals showed that the progress of non-income MDG has been very slow.

The Big Question is how to achieve the target by 2015?

In my opinion, there are basically three dimensions of overarching strategies to fight poverty. First is economic, second is social and third is political dimension. In all these three dimensions, I think all of us will agree that Education, particularly Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET), plays a pivotal role.

The Strategies for Poverty Reduction include:

  • Building Human Capital;
  • Building Information Capital;
  • Building Financial Capital; and
  • Building Physical Capital

I am glad to mention here that to discuss different strategies and solutions to poverty through education, CPSC has decided to organize an International Symposium that will provide venue for sharing different modalities and experiences on cross-cutting poverty issues and how to address them.

For Building Human Capital, EFA and TVET for All Programs will play very important role.

But here, I would like to mention few important dimensions of Human Capital Development to fight poverty.

  • One is Self-Employment
  • Second is Entrepreneurship
  • Third is Modular Skill Development
  • Fourth is Women Entrepreneurship

Regarding Women Entrepreneurship, I would like to mention about Grameen Bank, which has initiated an important initiative of promoting entrepreneurship for women through micro-credit. It was founded by Professor Muhammad Yunus in Bangladesh. To date, it has recorded that out of the 7.41 million borrowers,  97 percent are women.

I hope that you will have a very fruitful discussion of these dimensions during the 10-day regional program. I also hope that you will share your experiences, and provide case studies.

Allow me to finish my remarks with an excerpt from an ILO report, which states that:

"The Principal route out of poverty is Work. Work demands Knowledge, Skills and Attitude. Education and Training is the key to achieve all of these."

Let us all work together, plan together to fight poverty in the region.

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OPENING REMARKS
by Prof. Dr. Shyamal Majumdar
Inauguration of EMINENT EXPERTS GROUP MEETING (EEGM)
28 January 2008, Manila, Philippines
Distinguished Mr. Nirmal Ganguly, Senior Advisor to the President, Asian Development Bank;
Distinguished Delegates and Eminent Experts from CPSC participating governments;
CPSC Faculty and Staff;
Ladies and Gentlemen;


Magandang Umaga!

It is indeed a great pleasure and honor to welcome you all to the Inauguration of the Eminent Experts Group Meeting (EEGM) which we are holding from January 28 to 30.

We are honored by the presence of our distinguished colleague from the ADB, Mr Ganguly, who did not have any hesitation to join us in demonstration of his support and to share with us his insights relevant for this meeting.

Thank you all, for giving us your valuable time to help us in drawing out the blueprint of our new direction, the new CPSC Corporate Plan 2008-2013.

Now is the best time to look back to our activities and their impact, identify our gaps and the future strategies in accordance to the requirements of the Knowledge Era.

Repositioning TVET in the Knowledge Era is the overarching theme of the EEGM. This will be discussed comprehensively in the theme papers to be presented in the next two days.

We have just concluded last week a very successful International Symposium on Skills Development for Poverty Alleviation. No less than the Managing DG of the ADB, Secretary of Education of the Philippine Government and the Head of the UNESCO-UNEVOC were among those who have given their full support to the symposium.

This goes to show that in the journey of repositioning CPSC in this knowledge era, we can be sure that we have the support of our partner organizations willing to share in pursuing skill development to curb poverty problems in the region.

In the journey of repositioning TVET in the knowledge era, CPSC has the cooperation and sense of ownership of our participating governments to plan prosperity together.

As an organization, CPSC has initially acted as a catalyst of change, proactive and responsive to the needs of member countries. Because we firmly believe that "it is not the strongest species that survive nor the intelligent ones, but the one responsive to change."

If you see around us, a lot of changes are happening in the technological, economic, societal, and finally, in the TVET front. We heard varying school of thoughts on the real problems in alleviating poverty, the challenges and opportunities in solving them and the crucial role TVET has to play, to deliver skill development programs urgently required.

Now the important question is: What institutional framework and concrete strategies would be best to take a fast-tracked action?

A paradigm shift has taken place, 21st century has presented us a radically different economy and society with profound implications for TVET. This has called upon the need to fast-track initiatives.

TVET system in Asia and the Pacific region must adjust to this key stage, which includes globalization, ICT revolution, sustainable development and emergence of knowledge workers.

We need to carefully study all these trends and their impact on TVET which will guide us in formulating the vision, mission and strategies of CPSC for the next five years.

As affirmed during the National Consultation Workshop which we held last December 2007 prior to the EEGM, CPSC should prepare a Corporate Plan with newly defined goals, strategies and objectives under the new emerging trends.

The strategic plan should be based on Affirming, Altering and Adding strategies.

By these, we mean:

Affirming whatever we have done good that need to be continued;
Altering what needs to be changed; and
Adding new strategies for the new environment.

I am confident that the excellent diversity of your experiences as senior-level representatives of the member countries, is expected to draw out rich ideas to achieve our goals for this EEGM.

Reformulation and repositioning CPSC with the new vision, mission and strategic goals will make CPSC responsive enough to meet the challenges.

The EEGM is the third step of the Corporate Planning exercise. The output from this exercise will significantly lead to the finalization of the CPSC Corporate Plan 2008-2013 during the scheduled Senior Administrators’ Conference in March 2008.

The success of our programs in the next five years will largely hinge on the proper direction that will build Asia Pacific region through TVET for peace, harmony and sustainable development in Knowledge Era by internalizing our core values of 3T, which are Touch Mind, Touch Heart and Transform Life.

In summing up my welcome note, let me quote John F. Kennedy who once said that:

“Change is the law of life… and those who look only to the past and present are certain to miss the future.”

Therefore, I request and enjoin everyone to help us anticipate the future and draw a futuristic vision. This should be able to hold us to be more relevant, better, bigger and higher in implementing doable actions for TVET improvement towards poverty alleviation and sustainable development in the region.

Let us join hands together in building the Asia and the Pacific region.

Thank you very much!

 

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OPENING REMARKS by Prof. Dr. Shyamal Majumdar
National Consultation Workshop
5 December 2007, Manila, Philippines
Distinguished Executive Director, Dr. Clifford A. Paragua, Office of the Presidential Adviser for Education and TVET, Malacanang;
Distinguished Director of SEAMEO Innotech, Dr. Erlinda Pefianco;
Distinguished Delegates and Experts from partner organizations;
Ladies and Gentlemen;


Magandang Umaga!


It is indeed a great pleasure and honor to welcome you all to the National Consultative Workshop.

First, allow me to thank you for giving us your valuable time in drawing out the blueprint of our new direction, the new CPSC Corporate Plan 2008-2013. Now is the best time to look back to our activities and their impact, identify our gaps and the future strategies in accordance to the requirements of the Knowledge Era.

As an organization, CPSC has initially acted as a catalyst of change, proactive and responsive to the needs of member countries. Because we firmly believe that "it is not the strongest species that survive nor the intelligent ones, but the one responsive to change."

If you see around us, a lot of changes are happening in the technological, economic, societal, and finally, in the TVET front.

A paradigm shift has taken place, 21st century has presented us a radically different economy and society with profound implications for TVET. TVET system in Asia and the Pacific region must adjust to this key stage, which includes globalization, ICT revolution, sustainable development and emergence of knowledge workers.

We need to carefully study all these trends and their impact on TVET which will guide us in formulating the vision, mission and strategies of CPSC for the next five years.

CPSC should prepare a Corporate Plan with newly defined goals, strategies and objectives under the new emerging trends. The strategic plan should be based on Affirming, Altering and Adding strategies.

Affirming whatever we have done good that need to be continued;
Altering what needs to be changes; and
Adding new strategies for the new environment.

I am confident that the excellent diversity of your experiences is expected to draw out rich ideas to make national perspective view of CPSC evolve into a helping CPSC sustain itself as a regional center of TVET.

Reformulation and repositioning CPSC with the new vision, mission and strategic goals will make CPSC responsive enough to meet the challenges.

The National Consultative Workshop is the first step of the Corporate Planning exercise but nonetheless the most important stage since this will produce the base document to be put forward to the Eminent Experts Group Meeting in January 2008.

Therefore, let us all join hands together in building the Asia and the Pacific region.

The success of our programs in the next five years will largely hinge on the proper direction that will build Asia Pacific region through TVET for peace, harmony and sustainable development in Knowledge Era by internalizing our core values of 3T, which are Touch Mind, Touch Heart and Transform Life.

We thank you for being an important part of this process!

MABUHAY!

 

 

Acceptance Speech of the CPSC Director General Dr. Shyamal Majumdar
CPSC Turn Over and Oath Taking Ceremony
14 August 2007

 

  • His Excellency, Mr. Muhammad Abul Quashem, Chairman of the CPSC Governing Board and Ambassador of Bangladesh to the Philippines;
  • His Excellency, Mr. Rajeet Mitter, Vice Chairman of the Governing Board and Ambassador of India to the Philippines;
  • Your Excellencies, Members of the CPSC Governing Board
  • Ms. Mila Dawa Hernandez, Deputy Director General of TESDA;
  • Representatives from International, Regional and Development Partners,
  • Dr. Man-Gon Park and his team comprising of all Faculty and Staff members of CPSC
  • Dr. C.K Basu, Director Emeritus of CPSC;
  • Distinguished Delegates from the member governments
  • Distinguished Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen

Good Evening, Namaste, Namaskar, Ayubowan, Assalam-o-laikum, Anyeong-haseyo, Selamat Malam, Bula! Tashi Delek, and Mabuhay!

It is my great honor and privilege to accept the Appointment by the Governing Board as the Director General of the Colombo Plan Staff College, on this 14th day of August 2007.

I wish to express my sincerest gratitude, principally to the Governing Board, led by the distinguished Chairman, for giving me its collective confidence and trust, and for the opportunity to take on the leadership of CPSC for the next three years.

Allow me to thank my colleagues in the academe: Dr. Man-Gon Park, the Director General, the faculty members and the distinguished leaders of partner institutions from the education, training, industry and business sectors.

Thank you for joining CPSC in welcoming me on this momentous occasion.

I always believe that CPSC is a great family and we are all brothers and sisters of this great family. As all of us know, CPSC was conceived in India, delivered at New Zealand, nurtured in Singapore and fully blossomed in the Philippines, one of the greatest countries of love and affection having an excellent tradition and rich culture with great people.

I shall carry the mantle of leadership started by the forerunners of CPSC and my predecessors starting this day onwards until the end of my term as the chief executive officer of CPSC. I shall take this challenge with positive determination, strong conviction and a noble heart that CPSC, as an inter-governmental organization and family of nations, shall address, first and foremost, the human resources development needs of all the member countries, through technician and vocational education and training.

I believe that my extensive years of professorial and managerial experience with the National Institute of Technical Teachers' Training and Research in India, Regional Vice President, International Vocational Education & Training Association, as well as the wealth of international academic and consultancy experiences which I got from USA, U.K, France, Turkey, Finland, Egypt, China and almost all the members countries of CPSC, have given me the confidence and the willpower, to take our beloved institution, CPSC, to greater heights.

I am determined to form a broader base of service to all its clientele with a mission of creating and sustaining a Quality Culture.

My association with UN Agencies, UNESCO, ILO, ADB, ADBI, World Bank and SEAMEO make me believe that "Expansion is life and networking is the future in the age of "Blue Ocean Strategy." My term as head of CPSC will put great emphasis on the partnership and networking that we shall sustain to create opportunities for cooperation towards common goals. I shall dedicate myself to the finest management and direction of CPSC in order to effectively consolidate the gains and advance the College towards a new vision for prosperity, strength and peace.

I personally believe in 3C of change management process; Continue the good work, Change for betterment; and finally Create new value and innovation.

I will try to do my best. I give the Board, and all the stakeholders of CPSC, the assurance of my life-long commitment to CPSC, which started even way back in 1997.

However, it is imperative for me to seek your generous support, encouragement and inspiration, in order to achieve our noble vision and mission for the College, which I shall begin to lead and orchestrate effective today.

May I humbly request all of you to contribute to the shared vision of the college, towards building a culture of trust, respect, and mutual recognition.

I strongly believe in the team spirit and collective wisdom. In harmony, we have strength.

Allow me, Excellencies and Colleagues, to share with you, point by point, the major strategic focus that CPSC will proactively undertake during my term:

  • Widening and deepening the participation of the Member Governments;
  • Integrating regional issues with global trends;
  • Broadening the financial base;
  • Strengthening linkages with Developmental partners;
  • Meeting special needs of landlocked and island countries;
  • Internalizing a Q Culture in our activities;
  • Fostering innovation, creativity and critical thinking; AND
  • Applying Blue Ocean Strategy in Technical and Vocational Education and Training

Let us all make significant contributions to raise CPSC to new heights in the era of knowledge explosion, economic resurgence and ICT revolution. We know that the task is huge and challenging. But with all our determination, support and dedicated service, we will be able to make the difference.

Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) is widely recognized as essential to processes of development and poverty reduction. In many developing countries, issues of TVET access, equity, and quality have been identified as prerequisites to the achievement of development goals. Given the inadequacies of conventional systems of TVET, many developing countries have introduced innovative approaches to TVET and firmly believe that "If education is the key to development, then TVET is the master key to unlock unemployment and poverty alleviation".

I strongly believe that:

  • Coming together is Beginning
  • Planning together is Progress
  • Working together is Success

Let us all come together, plan together and work together for the prosperity and development of the Asia & Pacific region with strong determination and goodwill.

This is a great region of diverse tradition and culture, with immense potential to develop given the right input, right training and right opportunities for human resource development.

Thank you very much.

Mabuhay!