Mongolia Celebrates 91st National Day

July 11 marks the celebration of the Mongolian nation of the anniversary of the establishment of an independent Provisional People’s Government by the Mongolian People’s Revolution Party.

Mongolia has a rich history. In the 13th century, Genghis Khan and his successors conquered all of China and other territories to the west, including present-day Poland and Hungary. From the 15th century until the early 20th century, Mongolia was ruled by a Buddhist theocracy and a secular Mongolian aristocracy under the Qing Dynasty of China.

In 1911, after the Chinese Revolution, Mongolia declared its independence from China. In 1920, Urga, then the capital of Mongolia, was taken by Baron Roman Nikolaus von Ungern-Sternberg, a Russian anti-Bolshevik general who established a subordinate government. Ungern-Sternberg was defeated by the Mongolian People's Revolutionary Party (MPRP) with the help of Russian communists. A socialist regime was established on July 11, 1921.

The Naadam Festival

The Naadam festival is the biggest and most joyful celebration of the Mongols. It takes place from the 11 to 12th of July annually. The festival itself originated from the era of Hunnu Empire (209 BD) and was originally organized as a competition to test the skills of Mongol warriors between tribes. The festival comprises the "Three Manly Sports": wrestling, horse racing and archery. A fascinating and interesting event for all is where the 9 White Flags of Chinghis Khan are carried in a ceremonial parade from the State Parliament House to the Central Stadium and many other events to name a few.

The Naadam festival has been held for centuries as a form of memorial celebration, as an annual sacrificial ritual honoring various mountain gods or to celebrate a community endeavor. The festivities kick off with a colorful parade of athletes, monks, soldiers marching in perfect uniformity, musicians performing powerful military tunes, and Mongolians dressed in Chinghis-style warrior uniforms. It is the most widely watched festival in the country, and is believed to have existed for centuries in one fashion or another. The Great Naadam festival is lots of music, dances and sports and very colorful. Naadam festival's competitions were originally called "the three manly sports" and, thus, restricted to men. But over time, and under the influence of the former communist rulers' insistence on female equality, the horse races and archery were opened to all comers. Only wrestling remains a "manly sport". The best parts of the Naadam festival are the Naadam festival opening ceremony, Mongolian wrestling, Traditional Mongolian archery and Mongolian horse racing.

CPSC joins its Mongolian brothers and sisters in the celebration of its auspicious and festive event and wishes to extend its warmest regards to the Mongolian government.